created by Roy Luttrell  
 
WWW.FRONTIERWAGONS.COM
     email:HELENAROY@prodigy.net
 ATTENTION COLLECTORS!!!
Own a piece of the Old West. Miniature reproductions (1/8th scale) of many of the wagons and stagecoaches that helped tame the wild west.
Each piece is carefully researched to make sure it is as authentic as possible. Every part is handcrafted.
With special care given to minute details, from the wheels to the trunks they carry.
Every wagon is an original and is signed and numbered by the artist.  
  BUTTERFIELD STAGE
   (1850-1860)
The Butterfield Stage was one of the first Overland Stage runs. In1860 they merged with Wells Fargo.
          BUFFALO BILL'S WILD WEST COACH
  DEADWOOD COACH (1846-1876)
This coach was used by Buffalo Bill in his London Wild West show. Guest were allowed to ride on top and inside the coach during the performance.
 
           
 OVERLAND STAGE AND MAIL
 One of the first stage coaches to travel from the east to the west. The Overland stage brought mail, news, and the people to the isolated west.
    MT. WASHBURN SPECIAL
   Y-W 54
 When Yellowstone Park first opened this three seat passenger wagon was used for tours up to Mt. Washburn.Only 5 to 6 were built for this particular route.
    THE NORTH CONWAY
First in a series of ten concord coaches. The North Conway was a privately owned coach and one of the finest of its time.  
     JEFFERSON HILL HOUSE
Second in a series of ten concord coaches. It is one of the oldest known coaches in existence.        
    RAIL- ROAD COACH
            (1848)
This hotel coach could seat six passengers inside. One of the earliest known survivors. Includes trunks and luggage.                    
        KINNEAR STAGE LINES
One of the many stops for the Kinnear Stage was Tomstone, Az. It is rumored that Doc. Holiday was one of the bandits that held up this stage.
 
   CENTRAL OVERLAND STAGE        
   (PASSENGER WAGON)
This stage was built specifically for the mountainous terrain of the west. Very primitive in design.    
   GILMER &SALISBURY MUD WAGON
Gilmer ans Salisbury formed this stagecoach line in the early 1870's with the purchase of the assets of the Utah, Idaho, and Montana branches ot the Wells Fargo and Co.
 CROSS HOLLOWS STAGE
In 1874 August Scherneckau purchased a share of the Cross Hollow Stage Station. Unable to pronounce his name the Indians called him Shaniko and that is how the town got it's name. Shaniko had seven different stagecoach runs and was the hub for shipment by horse drawn wagons.
PASSENGER WAGON (MUD WAGON) 1850
This servicable stage was built specifically for the mountain terrain of the West, the builder used much heavier brake shoes.
In early 1860 the first stage was sent from Sacramento, Ca. to Portland, Or.
      BREAK WAGON (1900)
These wagons were used for training and breaking horses. They are the ancestoes of the Hunting Phaeton.
YELLOWSTONE PARK TRANSPORTATION      WAGON
 This coach was one of the first coaches used by Yellow-stone to carry visitors on sight seeing tours thru the park.
       YELLOWSTONE COACH
A sightseeing coach used in national parks. They were replaced in 1917 by motor buses.              
            WESTERN YELLOWSTONE COACH
This coach was used to bring the visitors from the hotels to the park.
 
             CONESTOGA WAGON  (1750-1860)
    They could haul from one to five tons of freight.The curved body kept the load at the center.    
  PRAIRIE SCHOONER
It was a decendant of the Conestoga Wagon. the Prairie  Schooner was lighter and rarely needed more than four horses.Very efficient freight carrier on the prairies in the West.
    COVERED WAGON    (1850)  
 This Farm Wagon with a covered canvas top was made famous by the migration of the early settlers to the west.  Includes many of the provisions needed by the settlers for their trip west.                    
 SECOND COVERED WAGON
Many of the settlers used a second Covered Wagon to carry extra supplies, equipment, and even an extra wheel for their long journey.  
       CHUCK WAGON  (ROUND-UP WAGON)
Used on the trail drives and for spring and fall round-ups, it was the cooks center of operations. Drawers at the rear of the chest carried utensils and food supplies. Icludes pots, pans, and other supplies used.              
    STUDEBAKER ROUND-UP  WAGON
 Different style of wagon but used for the same purpose.
 
   CHUCK WAGON WITH TRAILER
On the longer cattle drives they often used a trailer for the additional supplies, camp gear, and trail equipment.
    FREIGHT WAGON (1880-1910)
Freight wagons could be loaded with up to ten tons of freight. Bringing much needed supplies to the new settlers.
       BUCKBOARD
A true buckboard had one or several tough, flexable boards serving both as a floor and sole means of suspension.
      BUCKBOARD (1850)
 Carried many of the supplies purchased in town to bring back to the farm. Could carry anywhere from 1500 to 5000 lbs.    
   FREIGHT AND MAIL
This wagon was used primarely to carry freight,  mail, and supplies from the towns to the neighbouring farms.  
         HAY WAGON
This functional flat bed wagon was used on the farm to carry the hay from the fields to the barn.
    WOOL WAGON (1890)
Prior to trucks, wool was hualed from out-lying ranches to the railroad by wagon. They frequently used one or two trailers.
  FARM WAGON
After arriving at their destination many of the settlers would convert their Covered Wagon to a Farm Wagon. They left the canvas on the first two staves to protect them from the elements.
 
               JOHN DEERE
   (3 Box Farm Wagon)
The John Deere " Iron Clad "was a top of the line wagon. This one has three boxes that could be removed to make a one box wagon. Used mainly on the farms in the midwest to haul grain.
    DRUMMERS WAGON (PEDDLERS WAGON)
Storekeepers in villages and small towns ordered their merchandise from "drummers," salesmen who traveled about the country in their fancy wagons carrying samples and merchandise.
 BREWERY WAGON (1865-1915)
This pattern of wagon is speciially designed for the delivery of beer in kegs, it is intended to carry unusually heavy loads.This particular one was seen outside Carson City Nevada and used to carry kegs to Silver City and Virginia City.
         U.S. MARSHAL TRANSPORT WAGON
Used to transport prisoners from the city jail to the state penitentiary.
   
   HEARSE
Used to convey the coffin to the gravesite. The hearse was finely built and elegantly finished and decorated. Coffin included.
  MEDICINE WAGON (1885)
This wagon was used by salesmen of patent medicine,
whose products, often claimed to cure anything from headache to snakebit and was just as effective for harness oil or furniture polish.
To attract large crowds they often staged entertainment. Thus the start of the traveling medicine shows.
 
 MEDICINE WAGON (DENTIST)
Instead of selling patent medicine they would be used by a dentist, and for a nominal fee they would extract teeth, do fillings and cleanings.
    DOCTORS BUGGY
The buggy was built for comfort and speed. Buggies, like today,s automobiles, were built as stylish and comfortable as possible.  
 
    MILK TRUCK
Trucks of this type were made fo the exclusive use of wholesale milk by dealers, and could carry anywhere from twenty to fifty cans.
 DAIRY WAGON (MILK WAGON)
A common special-purpose delivery wagon that was intended for door-to-door deliveriy of milk and dairy products.
 HOSE WAGON(1896-1928)
Hose wagons were used by the fire departments untill  they were replaced by motorized equipment in 1928.    
       WATER WAGON  (SPRINKLING WAGON)
  They were used in towns where the roads were so thick with dust that they needed to be sprinkled continously during the summer..to keep the dust down. One of these towns was Klamath Falls, Or. They could carry 300 to a 1000 gallons of water and could be filled at lakes or at streams.                
 HOTEL OMNIBUS(1831)
Built in varying lenghts the most common size carried 12 to 14 passengers.They were used to carry the passengers from rail stations to the hotels.
 This particular model was used in The Dallas, Or.
    ROLL OF LUMBER  WAGON (1910)
Possessed with one of the first mechanical devices for unloading lumber. The wagons were so low one man could put a large load of lumber on alone, and then dump the load to the ground. This was accomplished by five rollers.
 LUMBER WAGON (1895)
This wagon had a standard 12 foot bed, used throughout th Northwest , for hauling lumber. This heavy duty wagon was able to carry up to 7000lb. or two to three thousand board feet of green lumber.
Prices available by phone #503-760-2780
Fax 503-760-2780
or email helenaroy@prodigy.net